Medical marijuana

Alaska Cannabist

There’s been monumental movement in the U.S. House. Even so, it’s movement nonetheless on another issue in the evolving world of legal cannabis.

One important thing to note hear, however, is that the legislation passed by the House didn’t go anywhere in the Senate.

And a new Congress took office in January, so everything has to start over.

Regardless, here’s the info from early December from the office of U.S. Rep. Earl Blumenauer of Oregon about House passage of the Medical Marijuana Research Act. The office sent out a news release under the headline “Legislation removes barriers to much-needed research on health benefits of marijuana.”

Read the news release below:

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The U.S. House of Representatives approved the Medical Marijuana Research Act, bipartisan legislation introduced by U.S. Reps. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR) and Andy Harris (R-MD) to address burdensome impediments to legitimate medical research.

Although 99 percent of Americans now live in a state with some form of legalized marijuana, current federal law greatly limits researchers’ ability to study the health benefits of cannabis.

Current barriers include the overly burdensome registration process, redundant protocol reviews, lack of adequate research material, and unnecessarily onerous security requirements.

“The cannabis laws in this country are broken, especially those that deal with research. It’s illegal everywhere in America to drive under the influence of alcohol, cannabis, or any other substance. But we do not have a good test for impairment because we can’t study it … This is insane and we need to change it,” Blumenauer said on the House floor.

“At a time when there are four million registered medical cannabis patients, and many more likely self-medicate, when there are 91 percent of Americans supporting medical cannabis, it’s time to change the system. Our bill will do precisely that.”

While the United States leads the world in biomedical research, research on cannabis lags far behind. A 2017 National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine report found that “research on the health effects of cannabis and cannabinoids has been limited in the United States, leaving patients, health care professionals, and policy makers without the evidence they need to make sound decisions regarding the use of cannabis and cannabinoids.”

The Medical Marijuana Research Act will address these limitations by:

Providing a pathway for researchers to study the cannabis products consumers are using from state-legal programs.

Streamlining the burdensome and often duplicative license process for researchers seeking to conduct marijuana research, while still maintaining all necessary safeguards against misuse and abuse.

Addressing the woefully inadequate, both in quantity and quality, supply of medical-grade marijuana available for use in such research.

Requiring a report by the secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on the status and results of new research on marijuana benefits.

This was the second vote held by the U.S. House of Representatives in the past week on Blumenauer’s federal cannabis reform priorities, following the passage of the Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement (MORE) Act on Friday, Dec. 4.

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